Trans fats in foods
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Trans fats in foods

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Published by AOCS Press in Urbana, IL .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Trans fatty acids.,
  • Lipids in human nutrition.,
  • Trans Fatty Acids -- adverse effects.,
  • Trans Fatty Acids -- analysis.,
  • Trans Fatty Acids -- metabolism.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementeditors, Gary R. List, David Kritchevsky, W.M. Nimal Ratnayake.
ContributionsList, Gary R., Kritchevsky, David, 1920-2006., Ratnayake, W. M. Nimal.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP752.T63 .T73 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationp. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16258983M
ISBN 109781893997967
LC Control Number2007001123

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ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xi, pages: illustrations ; 23 cm: Contents: Trans fatty acid effects on cardiovascular disease: animal and human studies / Shirley C. Chen, David Kritchevky, David J. Baer --Trans fats and cancer / David Kritchevsky --Safety and efficacy of conjugated linoleic acid / Michael W. Pariza and Martin P. Yurawecz --Metabolism. While I think this book has something important to say and more people should hear the basic message -- i.e, vegetable oils and trans-fats are the real culprit in heart disease,obesity, etc., not saturated fats from animals or coconut oil (in other words, real food) -- and Mary Enig's discussion of how her research was covered up various food corporations was a real eye-opener 4/5. According to the authors, trans fats are dangerous. Veiled, covert, and debilitating, these fats wreak havoc on our hearts. Trans fat is the George Bush of food. DeMaria said "It's actually stealth", the insidious killer. Trans fat, like sucrose, does not occur naturally in foods apart from dead animals or meat. It is manufactured/5(11).   Fried fast foods, such as fried chicken, battered fish, hamburgers, french fries and fried noodles, can all hold high levels of trans fat. The trans fats in these foods .

  Trans fats raise levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol and reduce ‘good’ cholesterol. Alarmingly, these trans fats rarely crack a mention on food nutrition labels. Ten of the most popular foods that contain dangerous levels of trans fats are outlined below. Be sure to check the food labels before you head to the check-out! Basically, trans fat content only needs to be listed if the food contains grams or more of it per serving. What that means is, if a food contains grams of trans fat in 1 serving, that food will have "Trans Fat: 0 grams" listed in its nutrition facts. This is when the hilarity ensues. First, few people ever eat 1 serving of anything.   Donut is one of the popular food items that have high amount of trans fatty acids. Fried Fast Foods: The most favourite fast foods in the world, like fries and sandwiches also contain 5 g and 2 g of trans fat, respectively, and thus should be ordered with caution. Frozen Pizza: Frozen pizza contains around 1 g of trans fat per slice or serving.   Trans fats actually occur naturally in animal fat and dairy, but at much smaller concentrations than the amount used in processed foods. Trans fats also have no nutritional value. While saturated fat (most commonly found in animal fat and cheese) and trans fats increase levels of LDL (“bad” cholesterol).

Trans Fat information from the National Institutes of Health. We need a certain amount of fat in our diets to stay healthy. Fats provide needed energy in the form of calories. Fats help our bodies absorb important vitamins—called fat-soluble vitamins—including vitamins A, D and E. Fats also make foods more flavorful and help us feel full. Most of the trans fat in the foods we eat is formed through a manufacturing process that adds hydrogen to vegetable oil, which converts the liquid into a solid fat at room temperature. This process. But the FDA says trans fats may still be in some of these foods: Crackers, cookies, cakes, frozen pies, and other baked goods Snack foods (such as microwave popcorn)Author: Elaine Magee, MPH, RD.   Trans fat is made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil. Many restaurant chains have stopped frying food in partially hydrogenated oils and so have significantly reduced trans fat .